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New York City Gay Guide

New York City Gay Guide

Gay New York City

That’s what New York offers gay visitors. Rich with the history of Stonewall, a lively LGBT community and the fabulosity of being the city that never sleeps, New York is so full of options it can be overwhelming. Don’t fret, it is not hard to plan the perfect queer-tinerary of the Big Apple.

Gay New York City
Gay New York City

A generation ago, LGBTQ+ visitors to New York City would have had to remain largely confined to the West Village to interact with their local community. But as social acceptance has gained and spread, so have the storefronts, restaurants and other businesses that are owned, operated and frequented by gays and lesbians. One great way to start your visit is with a pilgrimage to the famous crossroads of the West Village and Chelsea to soak in the history and local flavor of NYC’s LGBTQ+ culture. From there you can expand to Hell’s Kitchen and the newer, yet deeply rooted communities in northern Manhattan, Williamsburg and Queens.

New York City Gay Bars

New York City Gay Bars
New York City Gay Bars

New York City nightlife is among the best LGBTQ scenes in the world, and it extends well beyond classic gay neighborhoods such as Chelsea and the West Village to areas including the East Village/LES, Hell’s Kitchen, the Upper West Side and over those bridges and tunnels into the outer boroughs. Read on to find our picks for the best gay bars all over NYC, broken down by neighborhood, including tips on where you can find great drink specials, which venues feature fabulous drag queens and amazing live music, and what spaces have DJ spinning and plenty of room reasons to dance? Raise your glass: it’s time for a night on the town in the greatest city in the world!

Check out our list of the most popular gay bars in New York City.

 

Gay New York Guide – Gay Bars & Clubs, Hotels, Beaches, Reviews and Maps

Best LGBT Things to Do in New York This Week

 

gay nyc events

There’s never a shortage of LGBT things to do in New York, whether you’re looking for talks, film screenings, drag show or world-class gay bars and gay clubs in NYC. And the city’s queer scene isn’t confined to the established gayborhoods in Manhattan either. Nowadays, you’ll find LGBT events throughout the boroughs every night of the week. With so much to choose from, there’s no excuse not to get out there and have a gay old time.

gay new york book

Gay New York: Gender, Urban Culture, and the Making of the Gay Male World, 1890-1940

George ChaunceyBasic Books, 1994 – History – 478 pages 3 ReviewsThis groundbreaking work shatters the myth that before the 1960s gay life existed only in the closet where gay men were isolated, invisible, and self-hating. Based on years of research and access to a rich trove of public and private documents, this is a look at a gay world that was not supposed to have existed. Focusing on New York City, the gay capital of the nation for nearly a century, Chauncey recreates the saloons, speakeasies, and cafeterias where gay men gathered, the intimate parties and immense drag balls where they celebrated, and the highly visible residential enclaves they built in Greenwich Village, Harlem, and Times Square. He offers new perspectives on the gay rights revolution of our time by showing that the oppression the gay and lesbian movement attacked in the 1960s was not an unchanging phenomenon–it had intensified in the 1920s and 1930s as a direct response to the visibility of the gay world in those years.–From publisher description.

gay cruise bars nyc

Everybody has their own view of what a gay cruise is or could be. And they’re all correct. No two days are ever the same onboard – unless you want them to be. Each presents an opportunity to be spontaneous, try new things, learn a sport, take a class, take a chance, meet new friends, or rediscover an afternoon without a schedule. Of course, sometimes the best times are when you do absolutely nothing at all. It’s all up to you.

gay new york summary

Making use of oral histories, diaries, police records, newspaper accounts, and other archival material, George Chauncey has written a compellingly readable, densely packed social history of pre-World War II urban gay life. His is an overwhelmingly revisionist account of the way several generations of gay men came to understand their identity, forge a community, and conduct their social lives. Whereas it has been generally assumed that prior to the birth of the gay rights movement (launched by the 1969 Stonewall Inn riots) gays lived in deeply closeted existence, isolated from each other and invisible to the rest of society, Chauncey demonstrates that long before mid-century a complex, amazingly visible, and continually changing gay male world had taken shape. Neighborhood enclaves developed in Greenwich Village, Times Square, and Harlem; gay saloons and bathhouses, cheap cafeterias and elegant restaurants flourished; widely publicized dances and elaborate drag balls were regularly held and even straight spectators flocked to them. Gay men carved out public and private space for themselves in parks and on beaches, in books and on stage. What Chauncey does is to chart the geography of this newly recovered gay world and recapture its culture and politics.

lgbt culture in new york city

A destination as diverse as it is daring, New York City has always been a hub for forward-thinkers. Indeed, one such group of courageous New Yorkers is credited with launching the gay rights movement as we know it. LGBT individuals from around the world seek out the Stonewall Inn, the site of the 1969 Stonewall Riots and the place “where pride began.” Now a National Historic Landmark and an operating gay bar, travelers are thrilled to witness a crucial piece of LGBT history—and its legendary drag bingo, dance party, and “Big Gay Happy Hour” events. Happily, for nightlife lovers, the Inn is just one of many LGBT bars in New York City. Metropolitan, Cubbyhole, Phoenix, and Nowhere are all excellent destinations for open-minded entertainment.

gay area new york

When most people think of New York City, they’re really referring to the famous borough of Manhattan, which is also where you’ll find the majority of the city’s gay residents as well as gay-popular bars, restaurants, and other businesses. The gayest neighborhoods of note are Chelsea, Greenwich Village, and the East Village, all of them downtown, as well as Hells Kitchen, on the west side of Midtown. But there’s much to see and do all over Manhattan, from top to bottom. Just brace yourself for some of the nation’s highest hotel, bar, and restaurant prices, and arrive with plenty of energy and curiosity.

greenwich village gay area new york

New York City has one of the largest LGBTQ populations in the world and the most prominent. No other neighborhood in New York City (and perhaps, the country) holds as much historical and cultural significance for its role in the gay liberation movement as Greenwich Village. It is the home of the Stonewall Inn and has one of the nation’s largest concentrations of LGBT historic sites, monuments, organizations, and bars. But other NYC neighborhoods are gaining momentum as some of the city’s friendliest LGBTQ neighborhoods. Artificial intelligence website Localize.city, which provides buyers and renters with important details about NYC, has rounded up their list of the city’s most friendly LGBTQ neighborhoods.

lgbt culture in new york city

A destination as diverse as it is daring, New York City has always been a hub for forward-thinkers. Indeed, one such group of courageous New Yorkers is credited with launching the gay rights movement as we know it. LGBT individuals from around the world seek out the Stonewall Inn, the site of the 1969 Stonewall Riots and the place “where pride began.” Now a National Historic Landmark and an operating gay bar, travelers are thrilled to witness a crucial piece of LGBT history—and its legendary drag bingo, dance party, and “Big Gay Happy Hour” events. Happily, for nightlife lovers, the Inn is just one of many LGBT bars in New York City. Metropolitan, Cubbyhole, Phoenix, and Nowhere are all excellent destinations for open-minded entertainment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York City Gay Guide

Check Out Our Top Picks This Month

Check Out Our Top Picks This Month